books about hearing loss for kids and adults

Books About Hearing Loss for Kids and Adults

A friend recently asked for help finding a book about a child getting a cochlear implant. I found a few options and vaguely remembered books I’ve seen throughout the years, but it made me want to make a comprehensive list of as many of the books about hearing loss as I could find. In this list I have books about hearing loss, books about children with hearing loss, books about hearing aids, books about kids getting hearing aids, books with characters that have hearing loss, books with characters that are deaf, books about characters with microtia/atresia, books about characters with unilateral hearing loss, books about using sign language, and on and on. Hopefully I’ll eventually be able to categorize these books even more specifically by target age, but this is a good start!

Books About Getting a Cochlear Implant

Disclaimer: Some of these links are affiliate links which means I make a small commission if you click on the link and then make the purchase. This does not cost you any extra, but does help me with the costs of running Listen With Lindsay.

Now Hear This Harper Soars with her Magic Ears
Now Hear This Harper Soars with her Magic Ears

Abby Gets a Cochlear Implant

This children’s picture book illustrates the process of how Abby gets a cochlear implant. Abby, who wears purple hearing aids, has a progressive hearing loss and her family chooses a cochlear implant for her. The story goes on to describe hearing testing, cochlear implants and the steps a family would take to explore this option of habilitation for their child who has hearing loss.

Mellie and her Cochlear Implants by Med-El (free online PDF)

Mellie and Her Cochlear Implants is a colorful book about Mellie, a young elephant and her family. It tells the story of the family’s journey from the discovery that Mellie is deaf, through the process of cochlear implant candidacy, surgery, fitting, and use of her cochlear implants.

My Magic Ears

My Magic Ears is about a little girl who receives cochlear implants and the world of sound that she discovers.

Now Hear This Harper Soars With Her Magic Ears

This book is written by my friend Valli and her daughter Harper Giddeons. You have probably seen Valli around because of her super popular blog My Battle Call. Harper was born with hearing loss and had Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct Disorder so her hearing loss ended up progressing. This book talks about much more than getting a cochlear implant, but kids with EVAs are the ones who need books like this the most because they tend to lose their hearing when they’re older. This book is super relatable, funny, and inspiring and shows that kids with hearing loss can do anything. It’s a must have for your collection!

Books With Cochlear Implants

Happy Birthday to My Ears

Follow Jack, a profoundly deaf preschooler, through his first year of hearing with his cochlear implants. Listen along as Jack discovers the sounds of his world — animals, holidays, transportation and more! What will be Jack’s favorite sound of all?

Let’s Hear it for Almigal

This fun and original picture book introduces Almigal, a spunky little girl with hearing loss who is now determined to hear every single sound in the universe thanks to her new cotton candy pink cochlear implants. These sounds include a baby’s funny giggle, the robin’s chirps outside the window, the soft song played during ballet class, and especially her best friend Chloe’s teeny-tiny voice. But most of all, Almigal wants to hear her parents whisper to her when they tuck her into bed every night. Almigal’s spirit will have both children and parents alike rooting for her, while the story delivers a positive message about accepting and celebrating differences.

Marvelous Mary: Deaf With Cochlear Implants

What makes Mary so marvelous? She can speak with her hands and her voice, and listen with her eyes and with tiny computers hidden inside her head. This picture book helps introduce children to Deafness and the process of getting cochlear implants. It emphasizes Mary’s love for sign language and Deaf culture, and how her surgery was a way of gaining greater access to the world. The book helps familiarize siblings or classmates with Deafness, and includes an introduction to the experience of surgery.

My Cochlear Implants

I am a mother of a child who has received cochlear implants. He has two sisters who don’t have hearing loss. My husband and I do not have hearing loss either. And I was anticipating the day when my son would ask us why he is different in terms of how he hears. I’ve read a lot of books to my children and I’ve also been painting for years as a hobby. So I decided to combine the two and write and illustrate a children’s book about a child with cochlear implants. I hope to empower my son and inspire him to embrace his different way of hearing. While I was writing and illustrating this book I was thinking of all the hard of hearing children who would love to read a book with the main character having cochlear implants. I think it’s important for children to feel accepted and loved amidst all their differences they have with their surroundings.This book was written and illustrated with love, I hope you enjoy it and read it for your little ones.

Rally Caps

RALLY CAPS is a humorous, fun-filled baseball and camp story. Ten year old Jordan is injured in an unfortunate and frightening accident while trying out for the Little League Travel team. Recovery is difficult. At summer camp he struggles to conquer his anxiety and fear in order to return to his beloved game of baseball. He forms a friendship with a deaf Italian boy, Luca, who wears a cochlear implant. Luca’s compelling positive nothing is impossible attitude, along with the inspiration he draws from his idol, Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr., gives Jordan the courage to return to baseball with a passion. Find out what happens as Rally Caps are raised in the bottom of the final inning in the biggest game of Jordan’s life. Boys and girls alike will enjoy this touching story of persevering through difficult times.

Sammy and His Super Ears

Sammy Sea turtle wears cochlear implants. The other animals in the ocean think he is funny looking and different. But he shows them that he really isn’t different, he is just a sea turtle with SUPER EARS that likes to play just like they do.

Sleep Tight, Teddy!

The central character in this book wears a cochlear implant on her right side. The illustrations also show her cochlear implant charging station on her bedside table. Earlier editions have different illustrations and they don’t include any deaf characters.

Sophie’s Tales

Sophie’s Tales: Overcoming Obstacles is the second adventure in the Sophie’s Tales series about a little dog with hearing loss who uses a cochlear implant to hear. In Overcoming Obstacles, Sophie is ready to hit the agility course and make some new friends. She meets Champ, a glasses-wearing Labradoodle who is confident he will be the agility champion. Will Champ be the winner or can Sophie help him learn that sometimes winning isn’t the only way to have fun?

Sunny and her Cochlear Implants

Follow Sunny as she lives her life as a deaf child, in a hearing world, with hearing aids. Then, her life changes when her aids no longer help – but there is a solution. Sunny is about hope, acceptance and a positive “can do” attitude. This book is the first in a new series. In future books, follow Sunny’s adventures as she uses special tools such as a bed-shaker alarm clock, flashing telephone signaler, etc. to live her life.

Violet’s Story

Violet’s Story is about a little girl who loses her hearing. This story is for adults to share with children with hearing loss, their siblings, friends and peers. This book is recommended for children age five years plus. It is written by Senior Auditory Verbal Therapist, Frances Clark. 

Books About Multiple Hearing Devices

All the Ways I Hear You

All the Ways I Hear You first introduces our young hard of hearing narrator, Sy, and his neat hearing aids. From there, Sy goes on to introduce his diverse group of friends who are deaf, hard of hearing or deafblind and their own hearing technology and communication styles, like cochlear implants, bone anchored hearing systems, communication boards/tablets and sign language. The book also introduces other children in familial and support roles, namely a hearing sibling and a child of deaf adults.
This is the first book written by Stephanie Marrufo, who is Sy’s mom. When Sy was diagnosed with hearing loss as a 2-year-old, Stephanie began searching for children’s books that featured or included deaf and hard of hearing characters and found this type of resource to be extremely lacking. Once she decided to write her own, she realized the importance of being as inclusive as possible, and following that decision, this unique story came to life.
“All the Ways I Hear You” is beautifully illustrated by Priscila Soares, an artist with hearing loss who wears bilateral bone anchored hearing systems, and mother to a child born deaf who now has cochlear implants. She uses her talents to advocate for people with hearing loss by sharing their stories through her mixed media work.
If you are a d/Deaf or hard of hearing person, the parent or family member of a d/Deaf or hard of hearing child, an educator, a daycare provider, a medical or support professional providing services to d/Deaf and hard of hearing people, a community organization supporting d/Deaf and hard of hearing people, or if you are simply interested in adding inclusive resources to your children’s book shelf… This is the book you’ve been waiting for!

Elephant and the Lost Blanket

The central elephant character in this story wears bilateral hearing aids and the tiger is wearing bilateral cochlear implants.

Harmony Hears a Hoot

Harmony Hears a Hoot is a children’s book about a young owl name Harmony who relates to kids with and without hearing loss and teaches tolerance with her adventures! Follow Harmony on her first day of school as she meets new friends, enjoys her classes, and teaches everyone what it’s like to have something unique about themselves. This book is appropriate for children with hearing aids, cochlear implants, BAHA, and more. It’s also recommended for adults with hearing loss and devices to assist in explaining them to children.

Books About Having Hearing Aids

Gracie’s Ears

This is the story of Gracie, your everyday fun-loving kid who does everything that you do, but has trouble hearing. It’s as if her ears are sleeping! Can anyone or anything wake up Gracie’s ears? Based on a true story. Told in rhyme, this uplifting story with gentle illustrations is based on a real little girl who doesn’t realize her ears aren’t working like most people’s do. When her family searches for answers, she discovers the wonder of hearing aids and the sounds of the world. Gracie’s Ears introduces what hearing aids are to young children needing help to hear and to their friends who wonder – what are those things in their friend’s ears and what do they do?

Max and His Hearing Aids

Max and His Hearing Aids is a children’s book that provides better understanding to children and parents when they discover their child has a hearing loss. Written for a preschool audience, Max and His Hearing Aids invites readers to discover the joy and benefits of hearing aids.

Rivers’ Walk

A life-changing story for hearing-impaired children and their families, Rivers’ Walk tells the story of a vibrant, strong-willed, hearing-impaired bunny who discovers just how much fun wearing hearing aids can be. Wonderfully illustrated and written, Rivers’ Walk captures the imagination and encourages hearing-impaired children to embrace and wear their hearing aids. This story was inspired by a very real and very special little girl named Rivers, a student at The Memphis Oral School for the Deaf (MOSD).

Super Kena

Kena’s classmates make fun of her for wearing hearing aids, but what they don’t know is that her hearing aids give her ears super powers, turning her into Super Kena! Super Kena is assembling one fierce team to make a difference and help her classmates realize that each of them have their own super powers which make them more alike than different.

Using Hearing Aids

Many people are born with or develop hearing problems, which leads them to wear hearing aids. Readers learn about how these devices help those with hearing problems through accessible text and fact boxes that focus on science, technology, and guidance. The sensitive tone promotes self-acceptance for those who wear hearing aids, provides answers for those who may need them, and fosters a sense of empathy among readers who may know people with hearing problems. The imaginative illustrations, including colorful characters, make this an educational and entertaining learning experience for young readers.

Books About Getting Hearing Aids

And So, Ahmed Hears

Central character Ahmed can’t hear speech before being fitted with his hearing aids.

Cosmo Gets an Ear

This fun and imaginative book shows that wearing a hearing aid can be a pleasant experience. This humorous depiction of hearing, before and after hearing aids, makes it a best seller with children and Audiologists.

Maxi’s Super Ears

Maxi’s Super Ears is the story of the time a brave, young boy got his first set of hearing aids! Follow Maxi on his journey into the world of hearing. Maxi will inspire you to see beyond what is on the outside and to love unconditionally. This is a perfect book for the family, which teaches a beautiful lesson. If they can hear, they can compete.

Now I Can Hear!

Now I Can Hear! was written for very young children who use hearing aids. This book is fun and delightful, and will be sure to charm any young child, with or without hearing loss.

Books About FM Systems

Simone

Simone

Sometimes at school, the teacher’s voice didn’t make it all the way to Simone’s ear. The messages got mixed up! Never fear; Simone is a smart and resourceful Super Listener who uses her listening power, her brain power, and her FM system to solve the problem.

Simone features a positive main character who is hard of hearing. This light-hearted story and engaging illustrations introduce young readers to the use of assistive listening devices in an academic setting. The book celebrates each individual’s drive to best manage their environment, and their choice to use their preferred communication and learning tools.

Books About Hearing and Having Hearing Loss

Baby Loves the 5 Senses: Hearing (Baby Loves Science)

[From an Amazon Review] We really like the Baby Loves series, but this is my favorite so far.
A+ on all levels: the physics, the biology, the terminology, the inclusiveness (defines cochlear implants, hearing aids and shows sign language; racial and cultural diversity is showcased with all 4 different children in this story).
The illustrations are super charming.
And my kid won’t stop asking for it. 🙂

A Birthday for Ben: Children’s Book on Hearing Difficulties

It’s Ben’s 7th birthday, but he really doesn’t want a birthday party! When his friends surprise him, he then learns just how easy it is for everyone to join in the fun. Talks about hearing aids and sign language.

Diary of a Hard of Hearing Kid

This book gives readers a glimpse into the life of Isaiah Baier, a very normal, yet extraordinary, hearing impaired kid. After losing his hearing to meningitis at 20 months old, Isaiah began a harrowing journey through both trial and triumph. Be prepared to laugh, cry, and be inspired as Isaiah recounts every day circumstances from his own remarkable 11 year old perspective.

Elana’s Ears

Lacey’s luxurious life as an only child changes the day Mom and Dad bring home a new baby. Although Lacey goes through all the confusion and upset that any child feels when presented with a new sister or brother, she eventually comes to like having Elana around.

Freddie and the Fairy

Freddie finds a fairy, tangled in a tree. Freddie is desperate for a pet, so when he rescues Bessie-Belle and she offers to grant his wishes, he knows just what to ask for. The only problem is that Bessie-Belle can’t hear very well, and Freddie tends to mumble, and Freddie is given a net. So they keep trying. Luckily, the Fairy Queen is on hand to explain. This is a delightful tale full of Julia Donaldson’s trademark rhyme and wit, with a subtle message about hearing impairments.

I Can’t Hear Like You Talking it Through

Tom, who is a young deaf boy, narrates his story. He tells the reader how he wears a hearing aid to help his limited hearing. He also lip reads and is learning sign language. He signs to communicate with his friend David, who is profoundly deaf and can’t use a hearing aid. The book includes descriptions and illustrations of cochlear implants and radio transmitters. Tom talks about some of the negative experiences he has had, including being teased about his condition and how he had to make new friends, how his hearing aid can sometimes cause interference from computer equipment and how he sometimes misses what the teacher is saying. Tom explains that he used to be frightened at night in the dark and silence with his hearing aid switched off, but he has learnt to like it (and he isn’t disturbed by his baby brother!) Tom describes his visits to the hearing clinic where he is assessed and fitted for new ear moulds. His gran, who also wears a hearing aid, explains that sometimes people can be impatient and unkind when you can’t hear them. Tom mentions how helpful his friends can be by explaining things he has missed because of his deafness.

I’m the Boss of My Hearing Loss

Using colored drawings and a positive approach, this handbook is designed for kids with hearing loss and their parents. Kids learn how to manage challenging listening situations as well as important concepts about hearing loss.

A Sound Adventure

A Sound Adventure is a book written by Dr. Jocelyn Tubbs, Au.D. It is a story that helps children learn about how sound travels through the ear.

Jason and Ciara magically enter their Dad’s ear, following music notes through the sound pathway. They get to see all of the structures that help sound reach the brain!

Books About Characters that Have Hearing Loss

Addy’s Race

Addy has worn hearing aids for as long as she can remember. Her mother tells her this makes her special, but now that Addy’s in grade six, she wants to be special for what she’s done. When Addy joins the school running club to keep her best friend, Lucy, company, she discovers she is a gifted runner. Lucy isn’t, which is problematic. Further troubles surface when Addy gets paired on a school project with Sierra, a smart, self-assured new classmate who wears a cochlear implant. Addy is surprised to discover hearing loss is all they have in common—and a shared disability is not enough of a foundation for a friendship. True friends support each other, even if they have different passions and dreams. More importantly, Addy comes to understand that she is defined by more than her hearing loss. She has the power to choose how people will see her, and she does.

A Bear Hug at Bedtime

On my way to bed, I play with a tiger, a lobster and a bear – and lots of other creatures too. But why are they so familiar? In this celebration of imaginative play, a young child is surrounded and enriched by an extended and diverse family. Inclusive and playful, this is the ideal bedtime read. One review says the main character wears hearing aids, but hearing loss is not discussed in this book.

Dachy’s Deaf

Dachy wears a hearing aid. But sometimes, when his friends get too noisy, he likes to turn it off to get some peace and quiet. One day, when his hearing aid is off, Dachy falls asleep and ends up floating down the river towards a waterfall and a hungry crocodile. Can his friends rescue him in time? Read and approved by The National Deaf Children’s Society, this gentle story shows children that everyone is different and might have difficult situations to deal with, but with love and support they can get through anything.

Dad and Me in the Morning

Early one morning, a young boy wakes to the light of his alarm clock. He puts on his hearing aids and clothes, then goes to wake his father. Together they brave the cold as they walk down the dirt road that leads to the beach. Lakin’s understated story reminds readers that sometimes the best way to communicate doesn’t involve words, while Steele’s watercolor illustrations show that beauty is never far away.

El Deafo

[I own this one and read it myself and it’s FANTASTIC. The book is in English. Cece gets Meningitis and loses all of her hearing. She goes to get a hearing test, gets hearing aids, and gets fitted with a body-worn FM system to wear at school. Even though the devices are outdated the story and the humor and feelings are spot on! Get this book!!!]

A 2015 Newbery Honor Book Going to school and making new friends can be tough. But going to school and making new friends while wearing a bulky hearing aid strapped to your chest? That requires superpowers! In this funny, poignant graphic novel memoir, author/illustrator Cece Bell chronicles her hearing loss at a young age and her subsequent experiences with the Phonic Ear, a very powerful—and very awkward—hearing aid.


The Phonic Ear gives Cece the ability to hear—sometimes things she shouldn’t—but also isolates her from her classmates. She really just wants to fit in and find a true friend, someone who appreciates her as she is. After some trouble, she is finally able to harness the power of the Phonic Ear and become “El Deafo, Listener for All.” And more importantly, declare a place for herself in the world and find the friend she’s longed for.

Joss

In this first book of her series, catching waves on her board, Joss is all in, 100%. When the surf’s up, she pops out her hearing aid, hops on her board, and paddles into the waves. Joss is stoked to enter a surfing video contest with her surf sister Sofia and Murph the surfing bulldog. If she can master a killer aerial like the frontside air and get her brother Dylan to catch it on video, maybe she’d even have a shot at winning. But Dylan throws her a curve: he dares her to try out for the cheer team. No way — Joss can’t see herself as a cheerleader. (What’s with those ginormous hair bows, anyway?) She’s 100% surfer girl, and Dylan knows it! Still, if she takes him up on his dare, then maybe he’ll help her with her video . . . it’s worth a try, right?

Joss: Touch the Sky

In the second book in her series: Joss Kendrick is always looking for new ways to soar. So when her cheer team needs a new flyer, she can’t wait to step up (literally). Her high-flying skills on her surfboard and skateboard make her a natural for the role. But when her skateboarding act at the talent show turns into a total catastrophe — make that a dogtastrophe — Joss loses her confidence all around, even at the cheer gym. The cheer competition is coming up fast, though, and her team is depending on her to nail a tricky stunt. The problem is, Joss doesn’t trust them not to drop her. She wants to do an easier stunt, but if she plays it safe, can her team still win? And if they don’t, will her team ever forgive her?

Preemie Powered: The Story of SoundWave

The Doc has to help train the new recruit and help him discover his Superhero Power. Book written in honor of our son who was born premature and the obstacles he has overcome. The main character wears 2 blue hearing aids.

Ranvir Cannot Hear

Ranvir Cannot Hear is a magical story set in the plains of India and is about a little elephant who goes on a long journey in search of his hearing. On his travels he meets some wonderful friends along the way who can’t do certain things but tell him about the things that they can! Ranvir even finds out he has a special talent too… This is a beautifully illustrated children’s story with a message of inclusion and empowerment. Learn to find out what you can do and don’t worry about what you can’t. 10p of every book will be donated to the Rangammal school in India for children with a hearing impairment. Recommended for children up to 7 years old. British and American sign language alphabets are included in the back – teach your little one to sign their name!

The William Hoy Story

All William Ellsworth Hoy wanted to do was play baseball. After losing out on a spot on the local deaf team, William practiced even harder―eventually earning a position on a professional team. But his struggle was far from over. In addition to the prejudice Hoy faced, he could not hear the umpires’ calls. One day he asked the umpire to use hand signals: strike, ball, out. That day he not only got on base but also changed the way the game was played forever. William “Dummy” Hoy became one of the greatest and most beloved players of his time!

You Don’t Know Everything Jilly P!

Jilly thinks she’s figured out how life works. But when her sister, Emma, is born deaf, she realizes how much she still has to learn. The world is going to treat Jilly, who is white and hearing, differently from Emma,
just as it will treat them both differently from their Black cousins.

A big fantasy reader, Jilly makes a connection online with
another fantasy fan, Derek, who is a Deaf, Black ASL user. She goes to Derek for help with Emma but doesn’t always know the best way or time to ask for it.

Books About Unilateral Hearing Loss/Hearing Loss in 1 Ear

Lucy

Lucy

We journey with a quiet bunny, Lucy, as she discovers that she cannot hear in one ear. She visits the doctor, eats ice cream with her father, skates, draws, and dresses up for a masquerade ball.

Books About Microtia & Atresia

Jaycee’s Little Ear

This story is about a little girl coming to terms with her condition called Microtia (A small Ear). Will Jaycee learn to love and embrace her condition or will she go on wishing she was never born with a little ear?

Microtia Sophie’s Little Adventure

Having a baby is the most precious, rewarding and amazing event in anyone’s life, and everyone wants a perfect healthy baby. So imagine how it feels when your baby is born and the first thing you notice is that it has one small abnormal ear or even both ears are affected. This is what my daughter and her husband faced when Sophie was born in December 2010. Their first thoughts were how could this possibly happen. Is she deaf? Is there anything else wrong with her? No-one could answer these questions. The midwife said she had only seen it once before but had no idea what it was. Fiona and Colin felt totally alone and their family was devastated for them. At first the doctors were vague but soon were able to tell us it was a condition called Microtia. As we struggled to come to terms with what was happening we soon realised there was very little information anywhere to help us understand what this condition meant for Sophie now and in the future. Yes there were bits and pieces here and there but nothing that would tell us exactly what it was, what to expect, how to get help and how to deal with it. So I was inspired to write this book covering the first 5 years of Sophie’s life; being honest and telling it how it was, facing the ups and downs and realising it wasn’t as daunting as it seemed! My daughter and her husband have been very lucky from the onset, getting help from many sources both medical and otherwise. But we soon discovered through social media and talking to parents in similar situations that this was not always the case. Some families just don’t know where to turn and how to deal with microtia. This book is not just a personal story of a child, it also contains information on microtia, how to get help, surgeons’ opinions etc. So I hope through reading Sophie’s Little Adventure it will help all parents of children with microtia and any adults out there with microtia who have had very little help and understanding on how to deal with this little-known condition.

Books With BAHAs

Fairy Magic

When Isabelle meets a lovely fairy called Summer-Blue, she discovers a magical world, hidden in the woods at the bottom of her garden. She can’t wait to share what she’s learned with her family, but her sister and brothers don’t believe in fairies, and they don’t believe Isabelle! As a deaf child Isabelle can see and sense things that her family can’t. Her hearing aid helps her to understand their world – but how can she persuade them to step into hers? An enchanting picture book about fairies, friendship and family, by CBeebies presenter Cerrie Burnell, illustrated by Laura Ellen Anderson. The main character wears a BAHA hearing aid on a softband.

Ricky, the Rock That Couldn’t Roll

Join 14 spunky rocks (and their wise ladybug friend) on a fun and funny adventure about the importance of friendship and the power of perseverance.

When the rocks get together to play and roll around their favorite hill, they find that one of their friends, Ricky, can’t roll with them. Unlike all of the others, who are all round, Ricky can’t roll because he’s flat on one side.

His friends didn’t get it,
“Come Roll!” they would chant.
So Ricky tried, but replied,
“I’m sorry, I can’t.”

Determined not to leave their friend behind, the rock friend set out to help Ricky roll around – one way or another.

From the best-selling author of Tess, the Tin that Wanted to Rock, The Bear and the Fern and The Masterpiece comes this fun, funny and heartwarming that is loved by kids, parents and teachers alike.

Combining the spirit of The Giving Tree with the rhyme and rhythm of Dr. Seuss, Ricky, the Rock,/I> is ideal for children ages 3-8 and Pre K-3rd grade. This original story featuring the “You Rock Group” is a book that kids are sure to cherish as they grow, and ask to read over and over again!

Kids ages: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8
Grades: Pre K, 1st, 2nd and 3rd

The illustrations include a ‘rock’ called Leesie wearing a BAHA on a light pink soft band.

Books About Being Deaf

Can You Hear a Rainbow? The Story of a Deaf Boy Named Chris

Kindergarten-Grade 3-Chris, who’s about 10 years old, explains how he uses sign language, hearing aids, lip reading, and other visual clues to compensate for his condition. He compares himself to both a hearing friend and a deaf one, pointing out similarities and differences

I Am Deaf

Titles in the Live and Learn series take a child’s point of view–especially the view of children who either suffer from some physical challenge or lack self-confidence in going about their everyday activities. This book describes challenges that hearing-impaired children face, and how one child overcomes them to live a normal, happy life. This attractively illustrated picture storybook series encourages kids to understand themselves and overcome problems that have troubled them. Following each story are four pages of suggested activities that relate to the book’s theme. A final two-page section offers advice to parents. 

I Have a Sister My Sister is Deaf

A young deaf child who loves to run and jump and play is affectionately described by her older sister. ‘Can give young children an understanding of the fact that deaf children . . . share all the interests of children with normal hearing.

My Deaf Friend Can Do Anything You Can Do

My Deaf Friend Can Do Anything You Can Do is an African American children’s book for all ages that celebrates tolerance and acceptance. This story features a young deaf girl and her hearing friend who convey a tale about the misunderstandings of people who are deaf or hard of hearing. This book helps readers to clearly understand that deaf people can do the same tasks that others can do. In essence, My Deaf Friend Can Do Anything You Can Do helps to bridge the gap between the deaf and hearing community by giving a better, more accurate understanding of a deaf person’s life, abilities, and talents. Besides, this story also highlights aspects of bullying and promotes empathy for all. Throughout this book readers will notice different sign language signs as they read. This book encourages others to learn sign language and open their minds and hearts to the beauty of diversity!

Proud to Be Deaf

Ava is like any other 7-year-old. She likes to talk and laugh with her friends, is obsessed with dogs and loves being active. Ava is also deaf – and she’s proud of it. She loves her deaf community, that she’s bilingual, and that she experiences the world differently from hearing people.

In this book, Ava welcomes her hearing peers to her daily life, the way technology helps her navigate the world and explains common misconceptions about deaf people – and introduces some of her deaf heroes who have achieved amazing things. She talks about her experiences at school making friends with hearing children, and teaches readers the BSL alphabet and some BSL phrases.

Featuring photos of Ava, her friends and family throughout, plus illustrations of hand signs, this book celebrates deafness rather than discussing ‘overcoming challenges’ or ‘stigma’. Perfect for readers aged 5 and upwards.

Some Kids are Deaf

Text and photographs describe kids who are deaf, the ways they communicate, and some of their everyday activities.

Books About Deaf Characters

A Very Special Sister

[Review from @NotDumbBooks on Instagram] This was a surprisingly cute book! This is about Frankie, a little deaf girl, whose mom is expecting a baby. Frankie is SO excited and talks and signs with her cute hearing friends about the new baby. But then she starts to worry that her mom might love the baby more than her because it will be able to hear.

This book does such a good job of normalizing deafness and portraying deaf children as the normal children they are. This story is mostly about expecting a new sister, and the main character just happens to be deaf. I love when books do that. Especially impressed that this book was written in the 80’s and does such a good job.

Boy

There are so many stories out there about deaf and hard of hearing children that involve them having a hard time hearing, going to the audiologist and getting hearing aids or a cochlear implant, and then hearing better.

How refreshing to have A wonderful fantasy story about a little boy who gets involved in a war between a dragon and a king and his knights in shining armor and the boy just happens to be Deaf!

This book will appeal to children no matter what their hearing levels are! The pictures are beautifully drawn and the main character is endearing.

The Brave Princess and Me

In 1943, the Second World War is raging, and the Nazis have taken control of most of Europe.

Princess Alice of Greece has a reputation for kindness. Born deaf, she knows what it is like to be discriminated against.

With the invasion of the Nazis, all Jews in Greece are in danger, including young Tilde Cohen and her mother, Rachel. On the run, they are in search of a safe place to hide. When they arrive unannounced on Princess Alice’s doorstep, begging her to shelter them, the princess’s kindness is put to the test.

Includes a special section, with photographs, about Princess Alice. A real-life hero, Alice is the grandmother of the United Kingdom’s Prince Charles, and the great-grandmother of Princes William and Harry.

Cheshire Moon

Miranda is deaf and her closest friend Timothy has disappeared at sea. Without him, communication is difficult, often embarrassing, sometimes impossible. Miranda is left alone, alienated, and unsure of herself. Thrown into the company of Boone, a neighbor who helps her aunt keep up the yard, Miranda struggles with her loyalty to Timothy and her desperate need for someone who accepts her on her own terms, as Timothy did. When she and Boone discover they are having the same dreams about a mysterious island and an even more mysterious presence, Miranda must choose between the ideal world Timothy represented and the confusion and pain of the hearing world, opening herself to the risky, awkward relationships that it offers.

Deaf Cinderella

Deaf Cinderella,” adapted from a classic fairy tale with a Deaf twist by Adonia K. Smith and illustrated by Maureen Klusza tells the story in both spoken American Sign Language, presented by Jenna Smith, and printed English of a young Deaf woman called Deaf Cinderella who speaks in American Sign Language, grew up in a Deaf school, and is a proud part of the American Deaf culture. Children of all ages will enjoy reading this timeless fairy tale and learning about the unique world Deaf Cinderella lives in. Stamped with the ASL Rose Bilingual Seal, showing that the information is presented in spoken ASL and written English, the book includes 60 pages of illustrations, English text, and a QR code for purchasers to view the tale in ASL. Bonus: Special webpage linked to the book has more information, including sample lesson plans.

Deaf Culture Fairy Tales

Readers are transported into the enchanting world of fairy tales in this book — with one slight twist: all the stories have characters who are Deaf or sign. Designed for the reader who uses American Sign Language or wants to learn about sign language and Deaf culture, each story takes unexpected and fun turns, always with a lesson in mind. Classics in this book include Snow White, Hansel and Gretel, Three Little Pigs, Beauty and the Beast, and many others. Also included are signed songs and poems one can play with in sign language. Original illustrations help make the stories come alive. With such magnificent culture, history, morals, humor, and imagination, this marvelous book will delight readers of all ages.

The Deaf Musicians

Poor Lee! He used to be a jazzman who could make the piano go yimbatimba- TANG—zang-zang. But now he’s lost his hearing, and the bandleader had to let him go.

So Lee goes to a school for the deaf to learn sign language. There, he meets Max, who used to play the sax. Riding the subway to class, they start signing about all the songs they love. A bass player named Rose joins in and soon they’ve got a little sign language band. And in no time they’re performing for audiences in the subway, night after night.

Living legend and Kennedy Center honoree Pete Seeger, renowned poet Paul DuBois Jacobs, and Coretta Scott King honor winner R. Gregory Christie present a jazzy riff on the power of music, overcoming obstacles, and all the different ways to hear the world. So, who will listen to a deaf musician? Everyone!

Five Flavors of Dumb

Piper is a seventeen-year-old high school senior, and she’s just been challenged to get her school’s super-popular rock band, Dumb, a paying gig. The catch? Piper is deaf. Can she manage a band with five wildly different musicians, nurture a budding romance, and discover her own inner rock star, though she can’t hear Dumb’s music?

Moses Goes to a Concert

Moses and his school friends are deaf, but like most children, they have a lot to say. They communicate in American Sigh Language, using visual signs and facial expressions. This is called signing. And even though they can’t hear, they can enjoy many activities through their other senses. Today, Moses and his classmates are going to a concert. Their teacher, Mr. Samuels, has two surprises in store for them, to make this particular concert a special event.

Isaac Millman tells Moses’s story in pictures and written English, and in American Sign Language (ASL), introducing hearing children to the signs for some of the key words and ideas. At the end of the book are two full conversations in sign language and a page showing the hand alphabet.

Moses Goes to School

Moses goes to a special school, a public school for the deaf. He and all of his classmates are deaf or hard-of-hearing, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have a lot to say to each other! They communicate in American Sign Language (ASL), using visual signs and facial expressions. Isaac Millman follows Moses through a school day, telling the story in pictures and written English, and in ASL, introducing hearing children to the signs for some of the key words and ideas. At the end is a favorite song — “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” — in sign!

Nobody’s Perfect

Megan has spent forever planning her positively purple birthday sleepover. She’s even made glittery purple invitations for every girl in her class. Then a new girl, Alexis Powell, joins their class. Alexis seems perfect: She’s smart, pretty, and rules the soccer games on the playground. But no matter how hard Megan tries to be a friend to Alexis, the new girl is aloof or rude. At first Megan thinks Alexis is shy. Then Megan starts to fear that Alexis is treating her differently because she’s deaf. When the girls are forced to collaborate on a science fair project, Megan learns the truth — and realizes that nobody’s perfect.

Once again Marlee Matlin draws on experiences from her own childhood to tell Megan’s story. In this funny, poignant book, readers will root for Megan, a spirited young girl who doesn’t let anything stand in her way.

The Printer

“As a boy, my father learned to speak with his hands. As a man, he learned how to turn lead-type letters into words and sentences. My father loved being a printer.”
Each day in 1940s New York a young boy watches as his father goes to work in the noisy newspaper printing factory. But the boy’s father only feels the machines’ loud pounding and rumbling as vibrations through the soles of his shoes. He is deaf. Although his father communicates with a few other deaf printers through his hands, he feels largely ignored by his hearing co-workers. But when a silent deadly fire erupts, it is up to the father to warn and save his coworkers, even when they cannot hear him over the printers.
Myron Uhlberg draws on his own experiences as the hearing son of deaf parents to create this dramatic, evocative story that reflects a respect for deaf culture and the unique gifts each individual possesses. Historical details are deftly rendered and brought to life in Henri Sørenson’s extraordinary paintings that dramatize and illuminate the powerful text.

The Silence Between Us

Gr 7 Up—Moving halfway across the country and changing schools senior year would be hard enough for anyone, but for Maya, moving from a Deaf school to a hearing school is one adjustment too many. At her Deaf school, people didn’t stare or shout at her, and all the misconceptions about the Deaf didn’t rear their ugly heads whenever she was signing to her interpreter or trying to lip-read. And then there’s Beau, who makes it his mission to learn to sign to her the first day of school. Maya assumes he’s one of the “populars” who only feels sorry for her and is trying to make himself look good. Besides, Maya doesn’t have time to make new friends. She is focused on getting into a good respiratory therapy program in college so she can help people like her little brother Connor, who has cystic fibrosis. Can Maya let go and trust someone to care about her just as she is? Gervais has written a captivating novel that sheds light on how hearing and Deaf cultures make assumptions about each other or are stereotyped, woven into a teen love story. American Sign Language is utilized throughout the book, with Maya’s thoughts and words easily discernible. Teens will relate to the issues of parental influence, peer pressures, and first loves, but also revealed is a deeper understanding of what it means to be different in a world where sameness is the standard. VERDICT A solid addition to middle/high school fiction that allows for deep discussion about stereotypes concerning disabilities.

The Smart Princess and Other Deaf Tales

A unique and much-needed collection, The Smart Princess takes readers inside the fantasies, dreams and disappointments of young people who are deaf. This book is written and illustrated by winners of the Ladder Awards, organized by the Canadian Cultural Society of the Deaf. In one tale a princess runs away when her intolerant aunt forbids her to sign. Another story looks at the experience of being a deaf child at a hearing school. Two strangers, one giant and one tiny, become friends despite their difficulties in seeing each other. In another, a spaceship lands on a planet of the Deaf, forcing hearing astronauts to reconsider their ways. And in a poetic adventure, an imaginary tiger wreaks havoc.

Song for a Whale

In the spirit of modern-day classics like Fish in a Tree and Counting by 7s comes the story of a deaf girl’s connection to a whale whose song can’t be heard by his species, and the journey she takes to help him.

From fixing the class computer to repairing old radios, twelve-year-old Iris is a tech genius. But she’s the only deaf person in her school, so people often treat her like she’s not very smart. If you’ve ever felt like no one was listening to you, then you know how hard that can be.

When she learns about Blue 55, a real whale who is unable to speak to other whales, Iris understands how he must feel. Then she has an idea: she should invent a way to “sing” to him! But he’s three thousand miles away. How will she play her song for him?

Full of heart and poignancy, this affecting story by sign language interpreter Lynne Kelly shows how a little determination can make big waves.

The Sound of All Things

Experience the sights and sounds of 1930s Brooklyn and Coney Island through the eyes―and ears―of a hearing boy and his deaf parents.
A Brooklyn family takes an outing to Coney Island, where they enjoy the rides, the food, and the sights. The father longs to know how everything sounds. Though his son does his best to interpret their noisy surroundings through sign language, he struggles to convey the subtle differences between the “loud” of the ocean and the “loud” of a roller coaster. When the family drops in at the library after dinner, the boy makes a discovery. Perhaps the words he needs are within reach, after all.
Myron Uhlberg’s story, based on his own childhood experiences, covers the almost unique topic within children’s books of children raised by deaf parents. Ted Papoulas beautifully and sensitively portrays the family’s day to bring the whole experience to life for readers.

Books About Using Sign Language

Hands & Hearts

A mother and daughter spend a sunny day at the beach together where they swim, dance, build sandcastles, and, most importantly, communicate. But their communication is not spoken; rather, it is created by loving hands that use American Sign Language.
Readers will learn how to sign 15 words using American Sign Language with the help of sidebars that are both instructive and playful. And the beautifully illustrated beach scenes will appeal both to the deaf community and to hearing parents and children, who will enjoy this gentle introduction to some basic words in ASL. Hands & Hearts is a picture book unlike any other, revealing the special bond between mother and child.

Hurt Go Happy

Hurt Go Happy is a captivating novel for young readers by beloved author Ginny Rorby. The Schneider Family Book Award-winning novel is inspired by the true story of a chimpanzee raised as a human.

Thirteen-year-old Joey Willis is used to being left out of conversations. Though she’s been deaf since the age of six, Joey’s mother has never allowed her to learn sign language. She strains to read the lips of those around her and often fails.

Everything changes when Joey meets Dr. Charles Mansell and his baby chimpanzee, Sukari. Her new friends use sign language to communicate, and Joey secretly begins to learn to sign. Spending time with Charlie and Sukari, Joey has never been happier. But as Joey’s world blooms with possibilities, Charlie’s and Sukari’s choices begin to narrow―until Sukari’s very survival is in doubt.

Hurt Go Happy is the unforgettable story of one girl’s determination to save the life of a fellow creature―one who has the ability to ask for help.

Hurt Go Happy is the winner of the Schneider Family Book Award. It’s also an International Literacy Association Teachers’ Choices selection, a Book Sense Children’s Pick, a KLIATT Editor’s Choice: Best of the Year’s Hardcover YA Fiction selection, and a New York Public Library “Books for the Teen Age” selection.

Jessi’s Secret Language: The Baby-Sitters Club, Book 16

Jessi knows a secret language! She learned it from Matt Braddock, the BSC’s newest charge. Matt’s been deaf since birth, and he uses sign language to speak. Since Jessi is Matt’s baby-sitter, she’s been using sign language, too. 

Books For Adults

No Excuses: Growing Up Deaf and Achieving My Super Bowl Dreams by Derrick Coleman Jr.

Trailblazing Seattle Seahawks fullback Derrick Coleman Jr.—the first deaf athlete to play offense in the NFL—tells his inspirational journey of persevering through every obstacle, remaining dedicated to the hard work and a no-excuses attitude that ultimately earned him a Super Bowl victory. Great for readers of all ages.

Even at a young age, if anyone told Derrick Coleman what he couldn’t do, he’d just reply, “Watch me.” Diagnosed as hearing-impaired at age three, he faced a potentially limited future, but neither he nor his family were going to let that happen. Now Derrick shares the story of his remarkable journey toward NFL stardom, of the friends and colleagues who cheered him on when skeptics tried to chip away at his confidence, and of how every challenge he faced only strengthened his resolve.

At the heart of his story is his unconventional family, whose one constant was always love. When Derrick was misunderstood as “difficult,” or bullied and laughed at by schoolmates, he removed his hearing aids and listened instead to his mother’s advice: Never let anyone else tell you how far you can go.

Playing football became an outlet for Derrick’s restless energy and a way of proving he could forge his own path. As a senior at UCLA, he became a standout, an award-winning player who led his team with eleven touchdowns and demonstrated to the world what his heart had known all along: He had what it took to be a champion.

No Excuses is more than just Derrick Coleman’s story as a sports legend, inspirational role model, and icon. It’s a motivating and unique testament to the human spirit, to the potential inside everyone who has ever faced difficult obstacles. It’s about aiming high in life, giving it your all, and never ever settling for excuses.

The Story of Beautiful Girl

It is 1968. Lynnie, a young white woman with a developmental disability, and Homan, an African American deaf man, are locked away in an institution,the School for the Incurable and Feebleminded, and have been left to languish, forgotten. Deeply in love, they escape, and find refuge in the farmhouse of Martha, a retired schoolteacher and widow. But the couple is not alone-Lynnie has just given birth to a baby girl. When the authorities catch up to them that same night, Homan escapes into the darkness, and Lynnie is caught. But before she is forced back into the institution, she whispers two words to Martha: “Hide her.” And so begins the 40-year epic journey of Lynnie, Homan, Martha, and baby Julia-lives divided by seemingly insurmountable obstacles, yet drawn together by a secret pact and extraordinary love.

Some resources that helped me create this list

Ear Community- Books about Microtia & Atresia

Healthy Hearing

Love to Know

Wikipedia List of Childrens Books Featuring Deaf Characters

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